Critical Care & Emergency Medicine

FEATURE
MCC001 New insights into the gut as the driver of critical illness and organ failure
MCC001 New insights into the gut as the driver of critical illness and organ failure
Keywords in this article include: multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, gut permeability, intensive care medicine, microbiome
Source: The gut has long been hypothesized to be the ‘motor’ of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The theory posits that critical illness induces hyper-permeability, leading to translocation of intact bacteria into the systemic circulation, resulting in sepsis and organ failure
MCC002 Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?
MCC002 Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?
Keyword in this article include: blunt traumatic surgery, emergency medicine,
Source: Pancreatic injuries, both blunt and traumatic, are relatively uncommon, occurring in 0.2–2 % of all trauma patients and 3–12 % of patients with an abdominal injury. Nevertheless, these injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to concomitant or related injuries
Overview of Agents Used for Emergency Haemostasis
Overview of Agents Used for Emergency Haemostasis
Haemorrhagic shock remains the second most prevalent cause of mortality in civilian trauma. Coagulopathy, hypothermia, infection and multiple organ failure are potential complications resulting from severe blood loss. Source: Trauma Mon. 2016 February; 21(1): e26023. doi: 10.5812/traumamon.26023
Arrest of Liver Haemorrhage Secondary to Percutaneous Liver Biopsy of a Haemangioma with Fibrin Glue
Arrest of Liver Haemorrhage Secondary to Percutaneous Liver Biopsy of a Haemangioma with Fibrin Glue
Haemorrhage resulting from blank and penetrating injury to the liver remains a difficult therapeutic problem. Packing of the peri-hepatic spaces to control bleeding has been well documented, as has the use of finger fracture techniques in hepatic trauma to allow vessel litigation in the haemodynamically stable patient. Source: HPB 2002, Volume 4, Number 4 175–177 doi: 10.1080/13651820260503837
Use of local pro-coagulant haemostatic agents for intra-cavity control of haemorrhage after trauma
Use of local pro-coagulant haemostatic agents for intra-cavity control of haemorrhage after trauma
Uncontrolled haemorrhage as a result of trauma accounts for approximately 25–40 % of trauma-related mortality. In certain cases simple packing may not always be sufficient to control bleeding, especially in coagulopathic patients. Source: Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg . 2015 Oct;41(5):493-500
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